Mothering Sunday or Mother’s Day?

Mothering Sunday or Mother’s Day?

Posted by Lucy X on 21st Aug 2021

Mothering Sunday this year may prove to be a harder one for many of us than usual, but perhaps this means it is even more important than any other year to celebrate and thank the women in your life.

But where did Mothering Sunday come from?

Whilst mothers have been celebrated right back through ancient history, ‘Mothering Sunday’ has roots in the 16th Century Christian calendar. On the 4th Sunday of Lent people were encouraged to visit their ‘Mother Church’;this meant the church they grew up in, where their family may still have lived, to give thanks.

It symbolised the coming together of families and became a celebration; families would get together, domestic servants and apprentices, who had to ‘live in’, were usually allowed this Sunday off to visit their family, farm labourers would often have the day off too. Some people would have to travel long distances to get back home to family and therefore wouldn’t be able to do this often, so it made it more special, and this is how it became a celebration of family, mother’s and mother figures, more of what we recognise today.

The Apron Supply Co - BBQ

Mothering Sunday had fallen out of favour by the 20th Century, but thanks to Constance Adelaide Smith, a vicar's daughter, in the early part of 20th century it returned with great popularity. Her impetus for bringing back this tradition was reading about the American Anna Jarvis, who after the death of her mother, a woman who worked tirelessly with and educated women in caring for their children throughout her life, wanted to recognise the hard work and dedication of all mothers.

Constance however, wanted and argued long and hard for the day to come back to the Christian festival of celebrating the church rather than the more commercialised and secular American celebration.

The American celebration was called Mother’s Day and was and still is celebrated every May, along with most other Western countries that mark the occasion.

Overtime, particularly during the Second WorldWar when many Americans werein the UK in the forces, the two celebrations started to overlap and blend into the day we recognise today. In the UK it is celebrated on the 3rd Sunday of Lent.

Ideas of how to celebrate this year;

Baking Ideas

Historically, Mothering Sunday was also called Refreshment Sunday, meaning that the rules of Lent fasting were relaxed, and sugar and sweet things could be eaten, particularly Simnel cake; a light fruit cake covered with marzipan (The day has also been known as Simnel Sunday).

How about having a go at this recipe with your kids, or bake one to deliver to your mum? Or even get mum on Zoom and bake one each at the same time.

Simnel cake is a traditional cake for Mothering Sunday and Easter, here’s a Queen Mary Berry recipe you could try.

Berry's simnel cake recipe - BBC Food

Mary Berry's simnel cake recipe - BBC Food

Or if you want something a little easier, how about this recipe for scones? (I’m not working on commission; I've just never had a Mary Berry recipe fail!). You can put some cream and jam in little pots and have a mini afternoon tea for mum.

Craft Ideas

This bit could be good for Dad’s/parents- are you wanting an idea on what the kids could make for Mummy this year?

How about-

A homemade vase with flowers from the garden?

You will need; an empty jam jar or similar (larger the better), black board paint (try www.hobbycraft.co.uk), a paint brush, chalk and some ribbon and/or fabric.

  • Clean and dry the jar thoroughly.
  • Have/or help the kids paint at least 2 layers of blackboard paint over all the jar and leave to dry.
  • Choose some pretty ribbon or cut up some strips of fabric to tie around the neck of the jar.
  • Have the kids write a message or draw a picture on the jar in chalk.
  • Then just pick or buy some flowers to put in it. Perhaps have the children pick some when out on a walk?

Or

A hand decorated picture frame with a photo of you all in it or a picture your children have made, or a photo of your fur baby?

You will need; A wooden picture frame, sandpaper, PVA glue, a paint brush, shells, buttons or glitter or sequins (or something similar), some paint (optional), some varnish (optional).

  • Firstly, remove the glass from the frame and put somewhere safe. If the wood is varnished, it may need sanding down gently before you start.(Wipe with a damp cloth afterwards)
  • If you want a bright and colourful background, the starting point can be painting the wood all over with paint – this can be some emulsion you have left over or poster paints. You won’t need much.
  • Buttons or shells can then be added in a pretty pattern, or however the kids decide, around the frame with PVA glue (be sure to let it dry thoroughly). Or instead of starting with paint, the entire frame can be covered in buttons of all colours, or shells of different shapes and sizes. (Glitter/sequins can be sprinkled over it too)
  • To make the frame last longer it can then be varnished with a clear wood varnish, or the PVA glue, using a separate clean brush (you may want to do this bit dad, as it might get messy).
  • Add the photo or picture of your choice.

The Apron Supply Co - Buttons

A Present Idea from The Apron Supply Company:

Our Jenny Wren Gift Sets;

If you’re looking for a hassle-free, but thoughtful present for your Mum how about one of our Ethically Minded Mothering Sunday Gift Parcels. We have teamed up with @CuramandAmorem, a luxury beauty company based in Stamford, Curam and Amorem to add some of their beautiful, vegan friendly bath bombs to our Jenny Wren gift box, for that added pampering.

Our Jenny Wren Gift Boxes contain:

Gift Set Option One

  • One of our luxury, handcrafted Japanese crossover style apron made from organic cotton from The Organic Textile Company Organic Textile Company (organiccotton.biz).
  • Vegan friendly bath bomb from Stamford based beauty company Curam and Amorem
  • Packs of British wildflower seeds for mum to plant her own flowers and watch them grow rather than cutting down flowers. These seeds come in recycled packaging and are great to attract bees and butterflies to the garden or window box.
  • Fairtrade Chocolate.
  • A Greetings Card, we can add your message too, if you wish.
  • All of these items are carefully wrapped in eco tissue paper, recyclable boxes and 100% cotton ribbon that can be re-used again.
  • Free delivery within the UK, to the address of your choice.

Only £49.80/£53.88, dependant on size chosen.

Gift Set Option Two

  • One of our luxury handcrafted bib aprons made from 100% organic cotton denim from The Organic Textile Company. Available in small adult and large adult (as well as children’s size)
  • Vegan friendly bath bomb from Curam and Amorem.
  • Packs of British wildflower seeds for mum to plant her own flowers and watch them grow rather than cutting down flowers. These seeds come in recycled packaging and are great to attract bees and butterflies to your garden or window box.
  • Fairtrade Chocolate.
  • A Greetings Card, we can add your message too, if you wish.
  • All of these items are carefully wrapped in eco tissue paper, recyclable boxes and 100% cotton ribbon that can be re-used again.
  • Free delivery within the UK, to the address of your choice.

Only £26.34

Have a look at our website to browse and order for 2022

The Apron Supply Co - Gift Set

This year, we may not be able to gather as families to hug, celebrate and show our love to our mums, aunties, grandmother’s and step mums, in person, some may have lost their mother’s or mother figures recently, but we can still show our love from afar. Perhaps take a moment, on this Mothering Sunday to really think about those great women in your life, those who are here and those who are not, who have held you up, fought for you, laughed with you and cried with you, and just say, thanks. Save all those hugs up and we’ll be able to use them again soon.

So, whether you’re celebrating Mother’s Day or Mothering Sunday we at The Apron Supply Company, hope you have a lovely and safe one.